Topping Out Ceremony

Great to see one of the project I’m involve with reached this milestone.

Here are some of the photos from earlier’s celebration.

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Architectural rendering from Shepherd Robson.

Congratulations to all who are involved in creating this new landmark in Spitalfields area.

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Filtering sheets to print using Revit RTV Xporter Tools

Filtering sheets to print using Revit RTV Xporter Tools

Hello there, I trust you all are well.

Someone with in the company asked if he can print PDF’s using dynamo with the current revisions of the drawings? I said yes but instead of using Dynamo, why don’t you use RTV Xporter tools? Most of us have this tool installed anyway on our machine. However, some do not know how to use it.

If your company don’t have the license for this tool, why don’t you give it a try by availing the 30 days free trial? Here is the link where you can download the “RTV Xporter” Revit plugin.

https://www.rtvtools.com/product/rtv-xporter/

I know some of you who have been using Revit for number of years find this not interesting but for those who are just starting to learn Revit, carry on reading this post.

Today I will talk about how to add parameter which you can use as filter in selecting the drawings you want to print using RTV Xporter Tools add-in in Revit.

This is just one way of extracting PDF/DWG/DWF/ etc. in your Revit model and, honestly,  it works for me well.

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I will add an additional text parameter for the sheets. As you can see here, I only have Graphics and Identity Data as my sheet parameters.

Let me first create a Shared Parameter.

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Save it to the project folder or you can open your company Shared Parameter and add this to that, if it allows you to do so, if not, just create one and save it to your project folder.

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For this demonstration, I save it on My Documents folder as shown below then create a new Group.

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Add the Parameter Group Name

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Here you’ll create your new parameter. I called it “Print_Date” under “Text” type parameter.

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Click OK then OK.

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Next, I will add this new text parameter as one of our Project Parameters. Click on Project Parameters under Manage tab.

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Click Add…

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Choose Shared Parameter and only choose “Sheets” under categories

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Select the newly created text parameter then click OK.

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Click OK to exit the Parameter Properties window.

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As you can see, the new text parameter is now added as one of your Sheet Parameters.

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Now, I’ll highlight all the sheets I wish to print and put any value on the Print_Date parameter. For this exercise, I will use today’s date.

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Next, go to RTV Tools tab and click on Xporter icon.

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A getting started with RTV Xporter will pop up and I encourage you all to visit each section to help you familiarize with its interface and functions. If you do not want to see this window the next time you open RTV Xporter, just untick “Show at startup”.

Next, click “Close” and it will bring me to the RTV Xporter interface.

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Go to Project Parameters tab and click on Parameters

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Make sure the newly added parameter is checked.

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Then I have to close the RTV Xporter window in order for the new parameter to take effect. Click “Exit” which can be found in the lower right hand corner.

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Open again the RTV Xporter tools.

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As you can see, Print_Date is now added in one of the columns. You just need to scroll right to find this column.

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And here, I have the ability to filter all the drawings as shown.

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All the drawings with 20170704 Print_Date parameter value will be filtered as shown.

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And here is where I configure your printing settings and output. This section should be covered in the video tutorial that you can be accessed in the RTV Xporter Startup window or You Tube icon located in the upper right hand corner.

Let me use Bluebeam PDF as my PDF Printer.

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It will be annoying if you have 100 sheets to print and you need to click Save button for each individual file.

To fix it, jump to your Bluebeam and follow the procedure below.

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Then un-check the option saying “Promt for File Name”

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That should be it. The next time you print using RTV Xporter Tools, you don’t need to hit save for each individual drawings.

Again, this is just one of the options in exporting PDF/DWG/DWF etc. if you have RTV Xporter. If you don’t have one, printing can be accessed in the Revit menu options.

 

Sharing will enrich
everyone with more knowledge.

Ana Monnar

(*1954, Cuban-born, founder of Readers Are Leaders U.S.A.)

 

I welcome your comments, questions, corrections and additional information relating to this article. If you know a better way, please leave your comment, by all means let me know.

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Have a great day!

Cheers,

Allan Cantos

Creating your Power BI Project – step-by-step tutorial

Here is the Step-by-step Tutorial on how to create your first Power BI Dashboard

Here is the Step-by-step Tutorial on how to create your first Power BI Dashboard.

First, visit https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/ and click on “Get started free”

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Click on Download button to download the “Power BI Desktop for Windows” software if you do not have it installed on your machine yet. You may need to consult your IT if you do not have administration rights.

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Once installed, launch the application and you will see “Getting Started With Power BI Desktop” as shown below.

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Close the “Getting Started With Power BI Desktop” splash screen, then you will be prompted to login your email address and password.

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PB! - Create an account

A new window will pop-up for you to input your password. This will be the same password you use when logging-in to your office computer.

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Once signed-in, you are now ready to create your Power BI project. Here is how the Power BI work interface looks like. Default view is in Report tab.

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On top are the Menu options

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Right hand side are the Visualization tools.

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Start preparing the schedule for each structural element.

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Here is the sample schedule showing the total weight in kilogram (kg) of UC steel members.

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Here it is when arrange in Excel.

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Create a separate tab for different stages of design.

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And arrange them as your Final Table that you will use for your Power BI.

Take note of the Tab Name: Tonnage Summary

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Make sure that you arrange them in a Table format.

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Select the range of cells and press CTRL-T

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Keep “My table has headers” box checked. Click “OK” and you have now a Table.

Go back to Power BI Desktop. Here we will load our Excel data. Click on “Get Data”.

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And select Excel from the drop down lists.

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Then browse to where your excel file is saved and click “Open”.

Then you’ll be asked which Tab on your excel file you wish to load from the left hand side selection sets and you will see a preview of it on the right hand side.

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You should see on the right hand side under “Fields” the tables, with proper heading names, that have been populated from your excel file.

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Once loaded, you are now ready to create your Dashboard. I’ll leave it to you to choose your prepared visualizations and customize it using the options found when you click on the “Paint Roller Brush” icon.

Here is the final dashboard will look like.

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With the “Element Type” selection set on the left, you can easily see the total tonnage for each stages of design interactively.

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That’s it! You have now created your first Power BI Project.

Good luck and check back frequently! If you have any questions or comments regarding this process, or want to have a copy in PDF, please drop me a comment below and I will get back to you ASAP!

Thank you for dropping by.

Sharing will enrich
everyone with more knowledge.

Ana Monnar

(*1954, Cuban-born, founder of Readers Are Leaders U.S.A.)

 

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Cheers,

Allan Cantos

Uploading your Dynamo Graph to Autodesk Dynamo Studio

Hi, today we’ll talk about uploading your Dynamo Graph to Autodesk Dynamo Studio. This is a continuation of my previous post about Dynamo Hackathon Challenge 01.

I will run you through the process of uploading your Dynamo graph and this process is actually straight forward.

First go to the link below. You can use the software for a 30-days trial period if your company don’t have a license yet to activate it. You will need to have permission obviously to have the software installed on your machine if you do not have full admin rights.

https://www.autodesk.com/products/dynamo-studio/overview

Once you have the software installed, run it as you normally do when opening a program.

The interface is the same when you launch Dynamo from within Revit. Using Autodesk Dynamo Studio, you have the ability to post your Dynamo graph in the cloud then a corresponding URL link will be provided which you can send to everyone who would like to see and navigate on your Dynamo graph finished product.

Here is how the Dynamo graph from the previous post:

If you also recall, I used dimensions in millimetres on my Inputs:

But I was having a problem visualizing it once I uploaded the graph on Dynamo Studio and to fix that I converted those Input dimensions to metres.

These are the only changes I made on this graph, the rest are all the same.

Now we are ready to upload it on the cloud.

Provide the necessary information:

And hit “Publish”

Then you’ll see a URL link for your Dynamo graph that you can distribute to all your contacts who are part of the design team.

If you want to see how your graph looks like on the web, click on “Visit”

The link requires webGL, so use Chrome not IE.

Here is the error I’ve got when I tried to open the link using Internet Explorer:

Once again, here is the link for those who would like to play around the Inputs.

https://dynamo.autodesk.com/share/594fd76187a6904902481c0b

Can I get thumbs up? How about clicking to Share this blog with your network. Leave a comment too. If you know a better way, by all means let me know. Thank you for dropping by.

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Have a good day!

Cheers.

Allan Cantos

Dynamo Hackathon Challenge 01

Hello there. I trust all is well with you.

Today I’ll discuss about a Dynamo Challenge for Dynamo users within our company and we call this challenge as “dynamo hackathon”

First Challenge Description:

Part of the new state of the art research laboratory is plant equipment that services the building and is housed in several building adjacent to the structure. Each of these buildings has a distinctive flue extract tower that rises above the building.

We need to design a supporting structure for each tower however the dimensions of the tower are likely to change. Therefore the challenge is to create a dynamo graph that is dynamic, allowing adjustments to the width, depth and height to be changed by the user.

It is envisage that the tower structure will be formed from steel, beams, columns and bracing (see image below) so produce a graph that the user can assign the sizes of the elements.

 

Now let start the fun!

Based on the description given, we need to provide a node that the user can specify for the height, width and length of the structures.

First, look for the “Number Slider” node searching on the Library of by right clicking on the working area.

And place 3 of this and name it accordingly. I’ll leave it to you to provide the minimum, maximum and step values.

Next is to start creating the first column. We know that column consists of two nodes, the top node and the bottom node. To be able to have those nodes, we need to place a point. Let me assume that my first point or node is at (0,0,0) coordinates.

To place a point, search for “Point.ByCoordinates” node.

Without specifying the x, y and z values, the default values are x=0, y=0 and z=0.

Now we have created our first point/node.

Next is to add the other end point/node of the column which is offset by Z value relative to the first point and to do that, we need to have another “Point.ByCoordinates” node and connect the “Height of Structure” to “z” as shown.

Next is to connect those two nodes by a line to represent our first column C1. We need “Line.ByStartPointEndPoint” node.

Now we have created our first column.

Next step would be to offset this column in x-direction, y-direction and xy-direction which will represent the other 3 columns.

You’ll need this node:

The nodes that we need to connect to the geometry input are the two points so we need to create a list of point first. This will give us the other 2 points/nodes for column C2.

Again apply Geometry.Translate to the original 2 points and this time connects the Length node. This will give us the other 2 points/nodes for column C3.

And finally, for column C4:

Next, looking at column number 2, we need to connect those 2 points to create a column and in order to do that, I need to separate them first as Point 0 as my startPoint and Point 1 as my endPoint

Do the same thing for Column C3.

And finally, Column C4

Next, we want to create a beams to connect those 4 columns and at the same time specify the number of floors that this column can support. To do that, first I created a new number slider and name it NUMBER OF FLOORS as shown below.

Next is to divide the column into number of floors by adding a parameter and a node called “Curve.PointAtParameter” Assuming number of floors to be 6.

Make it 10:

Now do the same thing for the other columns and you should have something like this,

Next we are ready to add beams to each floor levels.

After that we are ready to add the cross bracings.

Then we will do the opposite side by starting the bracing from Column C02.

Now you can make a copy of this cross bracing to Y-Direction, which is our Length if you remember when we created the number slider.

Now it is completed, you can test it now by changing the length, width, height and number of floors.

As you can see, it is now dynamic and you have the full control on the sizes.

The final part would be assigning the Revit member elements.

And here is the completed Dynamo graph:

I am aware that there are many ways to model this challenge in Dynamo. I do have another version but it is not completed yet. I would be happy to see your own version by commenting and posting your own version if you don’t mind.

Thank you for visiting my blog and I hope this little tutorial helps you in developing your Dynamo skills specially those beginners like me.

Unless you try
to do something beyond
what you have already mastered,
you will never grow.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

(1803 – 1882, American essayist, lecturer and poet)

 

Have a great day!

Cheers,

Allan Cantos

Revit – Dynamo – Power BI Part 2 – Video Demonstration

Revit – Dynamo – Power BI Part 2 – Video Demonstration

In my previous post found HERE, you’ve seen the workflow of calculating the total tonnage of each building, save the calculated value to an Excel file that is link to your Power BI project and with just few clicks, your Power BI dashboard provided you an up-to-date information.

In this demonstration, I’ll show you how to create a breakdown tonnage summary of each structural elements in one of the building.

As before, can I get a thumbs up? How about clicking to Share this blog with your network. Leave a comment too. If you know a better way, by all means let me know. Cheers and thanks for watching.

 

Revit-Dynamo-Power BI – Part 2

Revit-Dynamo-Power BI – Part 2

In my previous post HERE, you’ve seen the workflow of calculating the total tonnage of each building, save the calculated value to an Excel file that is link to your Power BI project and with just few clicks, your Power BI dashboard provided you an up-to-date information.

What if your client wants to find out the breakdown tonnage of each element in one building? I believe you should have these values with you before coming to the meeting.

 

Image below shows the typical structural element that you can see in a building.
Let me run you through on how to create a dashboard for one of the building and for this demonstration, we will look at Building A01.
I am aware that there are some changes done to this model and if would be good to have the latest tonnage information of the structure on your Power BI dashboard plus a breakdown.
Let us have a review of the structural elements present the first time I ran the Dynamo script.
We have the following:
  •       Structural Floors (94 counts)
  •       Structural RC Beam (86 counts)
  •       Structural RC Column (565 counts)
  •       Structural Walls (258 counts)
 When I open the Building A01 Revit file, I have the following structural elements:
  •       Structural Floors (94 counts)
  •       Structural RC Beam (110 counts)
  •       Structural RC Column (548 counts)
  •       Structural Walls (258 counts)
  •       Structural Steel Beams (20 counts)

 CCreate a new schedule for Structural Steel Beams and it should look like the image below.
With the additional Steel Beams in the model, we need to add another line on our Dynamo to calculate its steel tonnage and to do that we can make a copy of one of the Group definition and rename it to, say “PBI – Structural Steel Beam Weight Schedule”
Select the view from the View drop down list.
Here is the completed node.
And we need to add one item on the list to accommodate the Structural Steel Beam as shown:
And connect your structural steel beam node to item4 and you are done for the total building tonnage.
Before we hit Run, we would like to have the breakdown summary as shown:
So we need to add some nodes to our Dynamo to provide us these values automatically.
In this demonstration, the table is created in Excel under new tab named “Tonnage Breakdown”
Then copy these nodes:
And replace the sheet name to “Tonnage Breakdown”.
Using Code Block, I’ve created these and will soon connect them to List.Create node.
Now let start with Structural Slab by connecting the calculated value (Math.Sum) to Divide node to convert it from kg to Ton.
Our item0 is SLAB, so let us connect this to List.Create item0 as shown:
Do the same thing for the rest and take note of the last one for Structural Steel Beams which you need to plug to item7.
For the rest of the items, just plug the respective Code Block nodes and you should have something like this:
Finally, connect your list to the data as shown:
Before finally hitting Run on Dynamo, check first the startRow and StartCol on your Excel file. The data should be written at Column 1 starting from Row 1 and in this case, our startRow and startCol values are correct.
Now hit Run.
And here is the result:
Here is the Power BI dashboard for Building A01, as you can see there are no values yet.
Now go to fields, right click on “Tonnage Breakdown” and hit “Refresh Data”
As soon as you do that, in a matter of seconds, your Power BI dashboard will provide you the up-to-date information.
Concrete Slab selected from the Element Type selection filter
Concrete Beams selected from the Element Type selection filter
Concrete Columns selected from the Element Type selection filter
Concrete Walls selected from the Element Type selection filter
Steel Beams selected from the Element Type selection filter
I am planning to create a video presentation demonstrating the procedures live soon.
Can I get a thumbs up? How about clicking to Share this blog with your network. Leave a comment too. If you know a better way, by all means let me know. Thank you for dropping by.